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Are Fathers just as capable at childcare as Mothers? Research Summary: Fathers, care-taking and hormones Men are not ‘biologically’ less suited to caring for children than women: • when similarly supported, both sexes develop childcare skills at the same rate (Myers, 1982) • through what they learn they can have similarly positive effects on their children...

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A New Study: Help for fathers who experienced their...   How can we help fathers who experienced their baby’s birth as traumatic? Research project Fathers wanted to take part in research I am training to work as a clinical psychologist for the NHS . I am carrying out a study as part of a doctoral degree to explore the experiences of fathers who have had difficulties...

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Motivating Fathers - Inspiring Women - Elevating Lives!... The time is NOW to change the way you think about the Father-Daughter relationship: Motivating Fathers - Inspiring Women - Elevating Lives! Click the link and be first to find out when this Powerful TeleSummit will be aired... https://app.hatchbuck.com/OnlineForm/33445304620

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Teen Girls and Dating? Uh, Not While I’m Still Breathing Keeping an open line of communication, is invaluable, when it comes to effectively parenting and remaining connected to your teen daughter" says Father-Daughter Practitioner Karen Davis-Johnson, MSW. Read what Mr. Dad, Armin Brott, proud father of three and a former U.S. Marine has to say in response to a question regarding...

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How To Potty Train A Girl If You Are A Single Dad   Even though you are a single father, you can still potty train your daughter. It really is not that different when it comes to potty training a boy or girl.   Actually the good news is that with girls, they are only taught to sit, so there is no teaching to stand and sit when it comes to potty training...

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Calling All Dads-Attend the Fatherhood & Families Summer Conference in Puerto Rico-May 28th & 29th 2014

Category : Event

San Juan, Puerto Rico 2013- Livestream Playback

Fathers & Families Coalition of America with Asociación de Maestros de Puerto Rico hosted a historical two-day program with outstanding faculty. Enjoy the playback from last year’s conference. : http://www.livestream.com/fathersandfamilies

FFCA LIVE

2014 Registration:https://www.123signup.com/register?id=dhfvg

James Rodriguez, Chief Executive Officer & President
Fathers & Families Coalition of America
Fathers and Families Coalition of America’ has an app!
Install it here
424-225-1323
602-237-0507 [fax]
www.fathersandfamiliescoalition.org

Join Us for Summer Fatherhood & Healthy Families Summer Institutes

May 28th & 29th  2014 – San Juan, Puerto Rico
July 2014 – Howard University, Washington, D.C.,
September 2014 – Canberra City, Australia

February 16-20, 2015
16th Annual National Fatherhood & Families Conference
Los Angeles, California

 

 

Are Fathers just as capable at childcare as Mothers?

Category : Daughters, Family, Fathers

Research Summary: Fathers, care-taking and hormones

Men are not ‘biologically’ less suited to caring for children than women:

• when similarly supported, both sexes develop childcare skills at the same rate (Myers, 1982)

• through what they learn they can have similarly positive effects on their children and on family functioning (Cia et al, 2010; Melnyk et al, 2006;. Firestone, Kelly & Fike, 1980; Adesso & Lipson, 1981)

• there seem to be no biologically-based differences between the sexes in capacity to provide intimate care (Parke, 2008)

• there seem to be no biologically-based differences between the sexes in sensitivity to infants (for review, see Lamb et al, 1987): fathers’ responsiveness seems to vary depending on the degree to which men assume responsibility for the care of their infants (Lamb and Lewis, 2010).

• in rodents, complex neurobiological modifications (brain changes) have been found in both males and females that become parents and care for their ‘pups’. Such changes – flexible thinking, managing feelings and paying more attention to others – persist long after the pups are weaned, making active rodent parents of both sexes ‘smarter’ (Lambert, 2012).

• In humans, levels of ‘nurturing hormones’ (see below) are found to be the same in men and women exposed to ‘infant stimuli’ before their babies are born (Storey et al, 2000) and when interacting with them afterwards (Feldman et al, 2010).

The act of caretaking causes hormonal changes in men (as in women) to facilitate caretaking:

• within fifteen minutes of holding a baby, men experience raised levels of hormones associated with tolerance/trust (oxytocin), sensitivity to infants (cortisol) and brooding/lactation/bonding (prolactin)

• the more experienced a male is as a caregiver, the quicker and more pronounced are the hormonal changes (for review, see Gray & Anderson, 2010; also Fleming et al, 2002)

• Possibly because of this, the sooner fathers of pre-term infants hold their babies, the sooner they report feelings of warmth and love for them (Sullivan, 1999)

• the more babycare that fathers do, the more satisfied and sensitive they tend to be (Goodman, 2005; Barclay & Lupton, 1999; Henderson & Browse, 1991).

 

Nurturing behaviour and nurturant-related hormones:

• in both sexes, these are linked with more positive parenting behaviours

• men with high prolactin levels respond to babies’ cries more alertly and positively than other men, and feel more sympathy for their distress (Fleming et al, 2002)

• fathers (including fathers of children with autism) who inhaled oxytocin via a nasal spray showed less hostility and stimulated their child’s exploration better than dads who had been given a placebo (Naber et al, 2010; 2013)

• hormonal changes have also been found in the babies of fathers who have inhaled oxytocin. This also translated into behaviour: those babies looked more directly at their fathers and were more responsive and exploratory (Weisman et al, 2012).

Testosterone and father-nurture:

• higher testosterone is linked with aggression (Book et al, 2001)

• lower testosterone has been connected with lower likelihood of searching for new partners and with better communication skills in men

• oxytocin delivered in a nasal spray lowers fathers’ testosterone levels (Weisman et al, 2014)

• men who live with a pregnant woman experience drops in testosterone before and immediately after the birth (Berg & Wynne-Edwards, 2001) and in the years following, when they are caring for children (Gettler et al, 2011)

• fathers who sleep in the same room as their babies record particularly low testosterone levels (Gettler et al, 2012).

• men with lower testosterone levels are more alert to babies’ cries, and feel more sympathetic and keen to comfort them (Fleming et al, 2002)

• the testosterone issue, however, is complex: baby cries decrease testosterone in men when coupled with nurturant responses. By contrast, baby cries uncoupled from nurturant responses increase testosterone in men (van Anders et al, 2012).

 

What does all this tell us?

The value of fathers’ active involvement in infant care to the development of nurturant fatherhood is clear. When this is not facilitated, the bond between father and child may be weakened or may never develop adequately.

Policy needs proactively to draw expectant fathers in – not only to the birth, but also to hospital appointments during pregnancy.

The design of parental leave policy should facilitate caretaking by fathers alongside mothers from the first moments after their babies’ births.

Advice to couples should stress the importance of both parents’ developing infant care skills and confidence as caregivers. Couples should also be made aware of strategies to achieve this: for instance, where they are ‘the secondary parent’ (due, for example, to their working hours), fathers should consciously hold their babies a lot during non-working hours, such as on family outings.

 

References

Adesso, L., and Lipson, P. (1981). Group training of parents as therapists for their children. Behaviour Therapy, 12, 625-633.

Barclay, L., & Lupton, D. (1999). The experiences of new fatherhood: a socio cultural analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29(4), 1013-20.

Berg, S.J., and Wynne-Edwards, K.E. (2001). Changes in Testosterone, Cortisol, and Estradiol Levels in Men Becoming Fathers. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 76(6): 582–59

Book, A.S., Starzyk, K.B., and Quinsey, V.L. (2001). The relationship between testosterone and aggression: a meta-analysis. Aggression and Violent Behavior. 6: 579–599

Cia, F., Barham, E. J. and Fontaine,, A. M. G. V. (2010). Impacts of a Parent Intervention Program: Their Children’s Academic Achievement and Classroom Behavior. Psicologia-Reflexao E Critica, 23: 533-543.

Feldman, R., Gordon, I., Schneiderman, I., Weisman, O., and Zagoory-Sharon, O. (2010). Natural variations in maternal and paternal care are associated with systematic changes in oxytocin following parent-infant contact. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 35(8): 1133-41

Firestone, P., Kelly, M.J., and Fike, S., (1980). Are fathers necessary in parent training groups? Journal of Clinical Psychology, 9, 44-47.

Fleming, A.S., Corter., Stallings, J. and Steiner, M. (2002). Testosterone and prolactin are associated with emotional responses to infant cries in new fathers. Hormones and Behavior, 42(4): 399–413

Gettler, L.T., McKenna, J.J., McDade, T.W., Agustin, S.S., and Kuzawa, C.W. (2012). Does cosleeping contribute to lower testosterone levels in fathers? Evidence from the Philippines. PLoS One, 7(9)

Gettler, L.T., McDad, T.W., Feranil, A.B., and Kuzaw, C.W. (20111). Longitudinal evidence that fatherhood decreases testosterone in human males. PNAS 108 (39) 16194-16199

Goodman, J.H. (2005). Becoming an involved father of an infant. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing, 34(2): 190-200.

Gray, P.B., and Anderson, K.G. (2010). Fatherhood: Evolution and Human Paternal Behavior. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press

Henderson, A. D, and Brouse, A. J. (1991). The experiences of new fathers during the first 3 weeks of life. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 16(3), 293–298.

Lamb, M..E., Pleck, J.H., Charnov, E.L., and Levine, J.A. (1987). A biosocial perspective on paternal behavior and involvement. In J. B. Lancaster, J. Altman, and A. Rossi (Eds.), Parenting across the lifespan: Biosocial perspectives (pp. 111-142). New York: Academic Press.

Lamb, M.E. and Lewis, C. (2010). The development and significance of father-child relationships in two- parent families. In M.E. Lamb (Ed.), The Role of the Father in Child Development (5th edition). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley (pp. 94-153).

Lambert, K.G, (2012). The parental brain: Transformations and adaptations. Physiology & Behavior, 107(5): 792–800

Melnyk, B. M., Feinstein, N. F., Alpert-Gillis, L., Fairbanks, E., Crean, H. F., SInkin, R. A., STONE, P. W., SMALL, L., Tu, X. and Gross, S. J. (2006). Reducing premature infants’ length of stay and improving parents’ mental health outcomes with the creating opportunities for parent empowerment (COPE) neonatal intensive care unitprogram: A randomized, controlled trial. Pediatrics, 118, E1414-E1427.

Myers, B.J. (1982). Early Intervention Using Brazelton Training with Middle-Class Mothers and Fathers of Newborns. Child Development, 53(2): 462-471

Naber, F., van IJzendoorn, M.H., Deschamps, P., van Engeland, H., and Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2010). Intranasal oxytocin increases fathers’ observed responsiveness during play with their children: A double-blind within-subject experiment. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 35(10): 1583–1586

Naber, F.B., Poslawsky, I.E., van Ijzendoorn, M.H., van Engeland, H., and Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2013). Brief report: oxytocin enhances paternal sensitivity to a child with autism: a double-blind within-subject experiment with intranasally administered oxytocin. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43(1): 224-9

Parke, R.D. (2008). Fathers in families. In Marc H. Bornstein (Ed), Handbook of parenting, Vol 3: Being and becoming a parent. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum & Assoc.

Storey, A.E., Walsh, C.J., , Quinton, R.L., and Wynne-Edwards, K.E. (2000). Hormonal correlates of paternal responsiveness in new and expectant fathers. Evolution and Human Behavior, 21(2): 79-95

van Anders, S.M., Tolman, R.M., and Volling, B.L. (2012). Baby cries and nurturance affect testosterone in men. Hormones and Behavior, 61(1): 31–36

Weisman, O., Zagoory-Sharon, O., and Feldman, R. (2012). Oxytocin administration to parent enhances infant physiological and behavioral readiness for social engagement. Biological Psychiatry, 72(12): 982-9.

Weisman, O., Zagoory-Sharon, O., and Feldman R. (2014). Oxytocin administration, salivary testosterone, and father-infant social behavior. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 49: 47-52

 

A New Study: Help for fathers who experienced their baby’s birth as traumatic?

Category : Daughters

 

How can we help fathers who experienced their baby’s birth as traumatic?
Research project

Fathers wanted to take part in research

I am training to work as a clinical psychologist for the NHS . I am carrying out a study as part of a doctoral degree to explore the experiences of fathers who have had difficulties after attending the birth of their child.

Experiencing or witnessing a traumatic birth can be extremely distressing for both parents; however, most research has focused on the impact on women. We think it is important to learn more about the impact these experiences have on men.

The aim of the study is to understand what makes the experience traumatic and how fathers try to cope with the experience.

We hope that this will help services provide better support for fathers in the future.

What does it involve?
The study involves completing a brief questionnaire online and taking part in a confidential telephone interview. Names are not needed.

To take part in the study you will need to:
• Be 16 years or older and living with the mother of your child
• Have attended the birth of your child, within the last five years, and found the experience traumatic
• Be willing to complete the questionnaire and a telephone interview

If you have experienced the death of your partner or child during childbirth, or your baby was in the neonatal unit for more than 7 days after their birth, the study would not be appropriate for you. However, if you are having difficulties with these experiences, support can be accessed via your GP. The Birth Trauma Association Click here for the Birth Trauma Association also offers support and advice for parents.

How can I find out more?
If you are interested in the study, please email me: Click here to email us
and I will send you more information.

This study has been approved by the University of Liverpool
Research Ethics Committee

Motivating Fathers – Inspiring Women – Elevating Lives! Watch the Father-Influence: Impact and Possibility 2014 TeleSummit

Category : Daughters, Fathers

The time is NOW to change the way you think about the Father-Daughter relationship: Motivating Fathers – Inspiring Women – Elevating Lives!

Click the link and be first to find out when this Powerful TeleSummit will be aired… https://app.hatchbuck.com/OnlineForm/33445304620

Teen Girls and Dating? Uh, Not While I’m Still Breathing

Category : Blended Families, Daughters, Family, Fathers

Keeping an open line of communication, is invaluable, when it comes to effectively parenting and remaining connected to your teen daughter” says Father-Daughter Practitioner Karen Davis-Johnson, MSW. Read what Mr. Dad, Armin Brott, proud father of three and a former U.S. Marine has to say in response to a question regarding a 14 year old girl who approached her father about the issue of teen-dating.

Q: Dear Mr. Dad, My 14-year-old daughter is obsessed with the idea that she needs to start dating. She says “all of her friends” are doing it, and feels left out. Fourteen just seems too young. I don’t think anyone—boy or girl—should start ‘til at least 16. I want to tell her “over my dead body” but I also don’t want to be that dad. What can I do?

A: As the father of three daughters—two of whom made it through their teen years without getting pregnant (the third is only 10 and I’m confident she’ll do the same)—I feel your pain. The very idea of your little girl, alone with a … boy, can bring up all sorts of emotions, headlined by anger (“Boys that age have only one thing on their mind”) and worry (How can I possibly protect her?”).

Let’s start with the “only-one-thing-on-their-mind” idea. Do you really believe that? TV, movies, and the Internet put a lot of pressure on teens to have as much sex as they can as often as they can, with as many different people as possible. But the reality is that the majority of boys your daughter’s age are petrified of girls, and what’s most likely on their mind is, “I’m hungry.”

As far as the “how-can-I-protect-her” idea, you have two things going for you. First, your daughter herself doesn’t sound like she’s all that into it and just wants to date because everyone else is. By telling you that, she’s almost begging you to say No. Second, even if dating were her idea, you’re right: 14 is too young for serious one-on-one dating.
That said, you can’t just play the tough guy and expect her to be happy about it. In fact, the more forcefully you forbid dating, the more you’ll push her towards it. Here’s what to do instead.

  • Really Talk to Her. You have a wonderful opportunity here. Your daughter actually came to you with a problem. That says a huge amount (in a good way) about your relationship. Ask her to tell you more about the dating her friends are doing, the pressure she feels, and what she actually means by “dating” (you might be thinking, “dinner, movie, make out in the back seat of the car”; she might be thinking “hold hands and share an ice cream cone”). Listen carefully and don’t be judgmental. When you sense an opportunity, talk to her about the dangers of dating, including violence (which, by the way is just as likely to be initiated by girls as by boys). Talk about relationships, sex, and the finances involved. You’re not going to wrap this up in one conversation, so take it a step at a time.
  • Establish some dating rules. Number one is that group dates are okay, one-on-one dates are not. End of story. Group dates let her be with the boy who makes her blush, but in a setting where inappropriate behavior is a lot less likely.
  • Tag along. In my view, groups of young teens shouldn’t be out and about without an adult nearby—there’s too much opportunity for things to go wrong. And if you want your daughter to see how serious you are, be the chaperone. Don’t be right in the middle of the group or try to be everyone’s buddy—that would only embarrass your daughter. Instead, walk half a block behind and sit a few rows away in the movie. But be there. Watch carefully, and let her enjoy herself.

A daughter who feels emotionally attached and secure enough in her relationship with her father to come to him regarding such topics, is a daughter who has been given one of the greatest gifts in her life. Fathers must know the value of their relationship with their daughters and the power of influence they have on her decision making , self-image, achievement and successes in life.

Hear candid discussions between Visionary Karen Davis-Johnson (Founder of the Father-Daughter Institute) and Powerhouse, Successful women about their father-daughter relationship, its impact and influence on their personal and private lives.

 

How To Potty Train A Girl If You Are A Single Dad

Category : Daughters

 

Even though you are a single father, you can still potty train your daughter. It really is not that different when it comes to potty training a boy or girl.

 

Actually the good news is that with girls, they are only taught to sit, so there is no teaching to stand and sit when it comes to potty training your daughter, which does make that easier.

 

However, you will still need to make sure that there are some items that you have on hand, to make the potty training process much easier.

 

These include:

 

  • Get a method: We strongly recommend Potty Training In One Day. This method takes some preparation, but the Potty Patty potty training line was designed to help execute this method. This potty training method works, and has been working for over 40 years!
  • Potty chair: She needs to feel comfortable and secure when using the bathroom, as well as being able to easily reach the toilet. Potty chairs are the perfect size for children and they are low to the ground too. The step stool is so that she can reach the sink after going to wash her hands too.
  • Potty training pants: The diapers need to gone and she needs to only be in potty training pants instead. These come in a range of colors and patterns to choose from and they are also available in waterproof style or waterproof covers can be put over them in case there is an accident. Later go to big girl underwear that have her favorite characters or that are just pretty.
  • Potty doll: This is great to teach your daughter with, as well as she can keep it with her when using the bathroom too. The potty training dolls are perfect for model potty training, so she can see what is suppose to happen and practice with it as well. They are great security items and she can play with the doll even when she is not using the potty too.
  • Potty training books and videos are great visual aids to use so that your daughter can see other girls her own age using the potty and that it is nothing to be scared of. She can see what other children are doing and see that that is what she will be doing soon as well. The books are fun and the videos many times have great songs in them as well to help teach her, as well as being fun to sing too.
  • You can also use potty rewards such as stickers, trinkets, potty calendars and potty decals too to keep your daughter interested and motivated as well. These are perfect to give as rewards, as well as stickers can be placed on the calendar so she can see her progress and success also. The potty decals are fun and can be placed in the toilet, on the toilet and on the walls even so that she feels safe when using the bathroom, as well as it is fun to go than too.

 

Part of potty training is letting your little girl see others use the bathroom, just like in the books and videos. She can watch you use the bathroom, try to sit to pee as often as you can when she is watching. Have her sit on her potty chair while you are in the bathroom, and don’t forget to TALK. Keep those lines of communication open even in the bathroom.

 

Don’t forget to enlist help from others! She can also watch grandmothers, aunts, cousins or even other siblings too to see them go to the bathroom as well.

LSU Athletics Dads and Daughters Events

Category : Daughters, Event, Fathers